150 years – or was it yesterday?

We feel it only fair to offer this gentle warning before you invest a few moments reading what follows. This piece is a bit different than others we have written. It draws heavily on history, reflects on those historical references and, with no subtlety intended, holds a mirror to what has become almost a cliché […]

By |2020-09-25T18:07:07-04:00September 25th, 2020|History|

Reflecting On Sullivan County’s Resort Scene

It’s the place where Jerry Lewis, Mel Brooks, and Rodney Dangerfield kicked off their comedy careers, the setting of the 1987 film Dirty Dancing, and a summertime destination for the stylish Maisel clan of The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel fame.

The name “Catskills” was derived from the Dutch “Kaaterskill,” which translates to “Wildcat Creek.” Although the Catskills […]

By |2020-09-25T18:03:54-04:00September 25th, 2020|History|

The Old Copake Falls Church

Miracle on Miles Road

The old church, which had first opened its doors to parishioners in 1892, closed those same doors in 1955. It would subsequently stand empty and unused for the next 30 years. “In 1979 the Methodist Church in Copake Falls, NY, was an abandoned and bedraggled building, windows broken, the door often left […]

By |2020-10-26T12:51:34-04:00September 25th, 2020|History|

The Polymathic Mrs. Pulver

by the Hillsdale Historians

Over the years, there have been a number of prominent women who have had a large and lasting impact on Hillsdale and Columbia County. One of them was Ida Haywood Pulver, a well-educated (for her time) woman whose many professions — photographic hand-colorist, dressmaker-to-the-stars, Parisian milliner, fundraiser, gardener, historical society founder and […]

By |2020-09-25T13:31:17-04:00September 25th, 2020|History, Main Street|

The Man Behind the Mountain

— by the Hillsdale Historians

The Taconic Mountains extend about 180 miles from southern Dutchess County and northwestern Connecticut up through Berkshire County, Massachusetts and on to Brandon, Vermont. The Taconics afford a number of spectacular views of the Hudson Valley; some feel that there is no finer view than that from the summit of Mt. […]

By |2020-07-23T08:52:33-04:00July 22nd, 2020|History|

“Housatonic in the 70s: Examining the Culture” An Oral History Podcast

The hills are alive with oral history and Housatonic Valley Regional High School student intern Valerie has mined student interviews with alumni from the 1970s to create a rich and thought-provoking podcast that explores the concept of culture within the school, the local community, and society at large. Valerie observes, “Even though I’ve lived in […]

By |2020-06-22T13:23:32-04:00June 22nd, 2020|History|

The Parla Foster House: A Brief History

At the corner of Rts. 22 and 23 sits an imposing brick house built circa 1783-1790 by a man named Parla Foster.

Although the house is listed in the Historic Hillsdale Resource Survey as being in the Federal style, it does not exhibit strong Federal characteristics. David Gallager, a local decorative arts expert and amateur architectural […]

By |2020-05-26T10:27:58-04:00May 26th, 2020|History|

Blog for the Common Man

It can be tempting to think of our town history in terms of its founding fathers, historic houses, and seminal events. But like the history of most small towns, those people, places and occasions serve as punctuation marks in the text of otherwise ordinary lives.

While Hillsdale, NY, indeed has had its share of larger-than-life figures, […]

By |2020-05-14T12:02:00-04:00May 7th, 2020|History|

Women’s History Month: The Night that A Nazi Bomb Did Not Drop on Copake Falls, and Other Stories of Copake Women in Power

By Howard Blue

Thanks to a congressional proclamation in 1987, March is Women’s History month. The designation came about as a result of the short shrift that women have traditionally gotten in many ways. Until 1839, for example, no American woman could own property. Then, in that year, Mississippi gave its female residents that right. Until […]

By |2020-04-02T10:45:19-04:00March 26th, 2020|History|

History from Home- Area Museums Open their Virtual Doors

The arrival of the COVID-19 virus in America and the resulting state mandates in the Tri-State area advising residents to remain home and for non-essential businesses to temporarily close their doors has undoubtedly had an impact on those places that require foot traffic or the in-person experience to maintain viability. As the Northwestern Corner and […]

By |2020-03-25T13:40:13-04:00March 25th, 2020|History|
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